Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

1235

Date

2014

Date of Award

8-5-2014

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

Major

Leadership and Policy Studies

Concentration

Educational Leadership

Committee Chair

Larry McNeal

Committee Member

Reginald Leon Green

Committee Member

J Helen Perkins

Committee Member

Donald Hopper

Abstract

This study examined the perceptions of parents on their role in involvement in their children's education and determined if there was a difference in parents' perception of parental engagement based on ethnicity. The data used in this study was taken in 2013 from a sample of parents of elementary (K - 5) and secondary (6 - 12) students in a mid-south suburban school district that consist of rural, urban and suburban schools. The following questions were researched in the dissertation: 1) What role does a parent's perception of child rearing values, goals, and expectations have when considering academic norms at school?; 2) What role does parent's reported actions and behaviors have in a child's day-to-day education?; 3) What role does parent's reported actions and behaviors related to major educational decisions have in the child's education?; and 4) Is there a significant difference in parents' perception of parental engagement based on ethnicity on the 33 individual items and across the four constructs? The responses to survey questions provided the answers for the research questions. Size of measurement and exploration of relationships through descriptive research, correlation research and group comparisons are emphasized in a quantitative viewpoint. Findings in this study are consistent with the argument that many parents are involved effectively in their children's education despite the consequences of cultural backgrounds and family circumstances. There is not a statistically significant difference found in parents' perception of parental involvement based on ethnicity on the 33 individual items and across the four constructs in the majority of the respondents. Considerable effort must be made to involve parents in their children's schooling, however; to best achieve this task, practitioners must explore parents' current understanding of parental involvement, how parents view what actions they are to take in regards to involvement and what are the expectations and perceived indicators of success of desired outcomes for that involvement. Further, practitioners should make the effort to understand the parents that they serve and convey to them that their opinions or suggestions are desired and important. To achieve such a phenomenon, parents must feel welcomed and valued as equal participants in their child's education.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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