Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

1302

Date

2014

Date of Award

12-2-2014

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Psychology

Concentration

General Psychology

Committee Chair

James G. Murphy

Committee Member

Meghan E. McDevitt-Murphy

Committee Member

Randy G. Floyd

Abstract

Nonmedical prescription opioid (NMPO) use is elevated among emerging adults and may be related to deficits in executive cognitive functioning (ECF). This study examined relations between NMPO use, ECF deficits, and "downstream consequences" of poor self- and emotion regulation among emerging adults. Twenty-seven emerging adult NMPO users and 27 matched controls completed measures of ECF (working memory and interference control), self- and emotion regulation, and a clinical interview assessing substance use. NMPO users reported regulation deficits relative to controls, but groups did not differ on ECF measures. Among users, interference control was associated with NMPO use, working memory with alcohol use severity, and emotion regulation with NMPO use severity and marijuana use. Across groups, goal-directed and implusive behavior when distressed was associated with interference control. Engagement in goal-directed behavior when distressed was additionally associated with working memory. These findings should be extended to inform research, preveniton, and intervention.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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