Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

1418

Date

2015

Date of Award

7-15-2015

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Psychology

Concentration

General Psychology

Committee Chair

Kathryn Helen Howell

Committee Member

Robert Cohen

Committee Member

Randy G Floyd

Abstract

Social support has been linked to fewer difficulties following childhood victimization. However, few studies have investigated how support might vary among individuals with victimization histories. This study examined the relation between childhood poly-victimization and social support from family and friends in emerging adulthood. Variations in this relation across gender were examined, in addition to the potential mediating roles of emotional intelligence and emotion dysregulation. Results revealed no significant gender differences, and that more childhood poly-victimization was significantly related to lower perceptions of support from family and friends. Emotion dysregulation, but not emotional intelligence, was positively related to childhood poly-victimization. Additionally, emotion dysregulation partially mediated the relation between childhood poly-victimization and support from family, suggesting that the ability to regulate one's emotions may be influential in perceptions of family support. Results underscore the enduring consequences of childhood poly-victimization, and offter directions for intervention efforts targeted at emerging adults with poly-victimization histories.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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