Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

1421

Date

2015

Date of Award

7-21-2015

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Psychology

Committee Chair

Philip Pavlik

Committee Member

Kristoffer Berlin

Committee Member

William Zachry

Abstract

This single-institution longitudinal study is used as an evaluative opportunity to examine the impact of the ACAD 1100 freshman orientation course on actual academic achievement, retention, and graduation outcomes. Expounding on a previous study by Burgette and Magun-Jackson (2008), some additional covariates (ACT and SES) were added to ensure ACAD and non-ACAD groups were comparable. For students in the two freshman cohorts examined, results of logistic regression as well as multiple regression analyses revealed that ACAD participation is advantageous in year-to-year persistence and college achievement at two-tailed significance p < .05 during all four years. Additionally, ACAD significantly increased the probability of four year graduation for all participants. Novel additions to the previous research are the notable impact of the SES by race interaction when looking at outcomes for different subgroups. This study provides evidence that previously identified differential higher education outcomes by race could be largely due to differences in socio-economic status.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

Share

COinS