Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

2462

Date

2015

Date of Award

7-23-2015

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Psychology

Concentration

General Psychology

Committee Chair

Kristoffer S. Berlin

Committee Member

Kathryn Howell

Committee Member

Robert Cohen

Abstract

Profiles of mothers' perceptions of infant (ages 4 weeks and 12 months) feeding practices served as predictors of differences in growth and adiposity, controlling for sex, race, and income. Participants were an urban sample of mothers and infants (N = 1,280), generally at risk for pediatric obesity. Latent profile analysis was used to determine profiles across the first year (at 4 weeks and 12 months). A manual BCH appraoch was used to relate profiles to growth and adiposity at 12 and 24 months, controlling for sex, race, and income. A three-class model of infant feeding practices was selected reflecting awareness of infant cues coupled with concern about infant weight. There were no statistically significant relations between latent profiles and growth and adiposity. As a comprehensive and longitudinal study using a novel person-centered approach, key observations about patterns of feeding practices were found that can be targeted for prevention of pedatric obesity.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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