Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

2486

Date

2015

Date of Award

10-23-2015

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Psychology

Concentration

General Psychology

Committee Chair

Robert A Neimeyer

Committee Member

Idia Thurston

Committee Member

Latrice Pichon

Abstract

The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has experienced widespread violence, including sexual violence. Sexual violence toward women includes rape, genital mutilation, and sexual slavery. Many Congolese have sought to escape such conditions as refugees in the United States. In the present study, we examined lived spiritual experiences of nine Congolese refugee women, survivors of sexual violence. Overall, this study provides new insights into participants' experiences of spirituality in the aftermath of sexual trauma and in living as a refugee. Consensual qualitative research (CQR) methods were used to analyze participants' responses to a semi-structured interview protocol. Participants endorsed faith that God was in control, reliance on prayer, gratitude toward God, and difficulty practicing their in the U.S. relative to Africa. Results indicated that religion/spirituality is an integral part of the women's lives and that it appears to facilitate coping. Clinical and community mental health implications are discussed.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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