Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

2533

Date

2015

Date of Award

12-2-2015

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Psychology

Concentration

General Psychology

Committee Chair

Frank Andrasik

Committee Member

Idia Thurston

Committee Member

George Relyea

Abstract

African Americans are at an increased risk of comorbid obesity-hypertension. This study examined the disparity through the lens of identity based-motivation theory. A latent profile analysis was conducted, to explicate the within group diversity of African American identity endorsement, distinguishing two classes based of racial group closeness; high closeness and moderate closeness. The findings suggest that identity, particularly moderate closeness, was significantly predictive of comorbid obesity-hypertension, both directly as well as indirectly through activity engagement. Socioeconomic status, however did not moderate the relation. We conclude that investigations of identity are particularly relevant to conceptualizing predictors of comorbid obesity-hypertension for African Americans.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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