Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

2621

Date

2016

Date of Award

4-20-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Psychology

Committee Chair

Kathryn H. Howell

Committee Member

Robert Cohen

Committee Member

Robert A. Neimeyer

Abstract

Previous grief research has centered on one time-point, without considering how loss may occur across developmental periods. Taking a lifespan approach, the current study divided 441 bereaved emerging adults into three groups: those who experienced death in childhood, in emerging adulthood, or during both developmental periods. Differences between the groups on circumstances of the loss, cumulative trauma, trait resilience, and grief symptomatology were examined. Significant group differences for time since loss, relationship to the deceased, cumulative trauma, cumulative loss, and grief symptomatology were found. A moderation model was conducted to determine the direct effect of resilience on grief and how this association differed based on loss group status. Although there was a direct effect of resilience on grief, the relationship between trait resilience and grief symptomatology did not differ based on group status. Findings highlight the universal impact of resilience on grief despite circumstances of the loss.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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