Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

2634

Author

Thomas Dodson

Date

2016

Date of Award

4-20-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Psychology

Committee Chair

J. Gayle Beck

Committee Member

Marylene Cloitre Cloitre

Committee Member

Philip Pavlik

Abstract

Feelings of shame have been related to both posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and turning away from social support. Based on this past reseach, the current study evaluated shame as a possible intermediary process in the relationship between PTSD symptoms and negative attitudes toward using social support in 202 female survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV). A history of childhood abuse (CA) was also evaluated as a moderator of the relationship between shame and negative attitudes about social support. Path analyses supported a significant indirect relationship between PTSD and negative attitudes about social support through shame. Additionally, CA moderated this effect, such that women with a history of CA in addition to IPV showed a stronger relationship between PTSD and negative attitudes toward social support through shame. The findings support the relevance of shame following IPV and CA, and the role of shame in strengthening negative beliefs about using social support.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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