Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

4776

Date

2016

Date of Award

10-28-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Psychology

Concentration

General Psychology

Committee Chair

Robert A Neimeyer

Committee Member

Meghan McDevitt-Murphy

Committee Member

Latrice Pichon

Abstract

Psychological adaptation following homicide loss can prove more challenging for grievers than other types of losses. Although social support can be beneficial in bereavement, research is mixed in terms of identifying whether it serves as a buffer to distress following traumatic loss. In particular, studies have not parsed out specific domains of social support that best predict positive bereavement outcomes. Recruiting a sample of 47 African Americans bereaved by homicide, we examined six types of social support along with the griever's perceived need for or satisfaction with each, and analyzed them in relation to depression, anxiety, complicated grief (CG), and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) outcomes. Results of multivariate analyses revealed that the griever's level of satisfaction with physical assistance at the initial assessment best predicted lower levels of depression, anxiety, and PTSD six months later, while less need for physical assistance predicted lower CG at follow-up. Clinical implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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