Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

208

Date

2011

Date of Award

1-12-2011

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Major

Sociology

Committee Chair

Larry Petersen

Committee Member

Carol Rambo

Committee Member

Wesley James

Abstract

Although a primary tenet of Christianity is service to others, the level to which denominations extend such assistance greatly varies. Recent research attributes this variance to differences in church theology. Evangelical theology stresses anti-structuralism and de-emphasizes the ethical teachings of Christianity while the opposite is true of non-evangelical theology. These differences are thought to limit assistance to others in evangelical churches and to promote such assistance in non-evangelical churches. Using data from the U.S. Congregational Life Survey, I test these ideas by examining the relationship between type of denomination (evangelical vs. non-evangelical) and whether or not churches have programs such as housing for those in need, prison or jail ministry, substance abuse recovery, etc. Surprisingly, the findings offer virtually no support for the predicted outcomes. I will explain the evidence found in this study, and discuss the ramifications regarding religious research.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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