Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

4861

Date

2017

Date of Award

4-3-2017

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Psychology

Concentration

General Psychology

Committee Chair

James G. Murphy

Committee Member

Meghan McDevitt-Murphy

Committee Member

Philip Pavlik

Abstract

Elevated depression and stress have been linked to greater levels of alcohol problems among young adults even after taking into account drinking level. The current study attempts to elucidate variables that might mediated the relation between symptoms of depression and stress and alcohol-related problems, including demand, future time orientation, and craving. Future orientation and craving significantly mediated the relation between depressive symptoms and alcohol-related problems. Alcohol demand, future orientation, and craving significantly mediated the relation between stress symptoms and alcohol-related problems. Heavy drinking young adults who experience stress or depression are likely to experience alcohol problems, and this is due in part to elevations in craving and alcohol demand, and less sensitivity to future outcomes. Interventions targeting alcohol misuse in young adults with elevated levels of depression and stress should attempt to increase future orientation and decrease craving and alcohol reward value.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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