Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

4863

Date

2017

Date of Award

4-13-2017

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Psychology

Concentration

General Psychology

Committee Chair

James G Murphy

Committee Member

Meghan McDevitt-Murphy

Committee Member

Nicholas W Simon

Abstract

Demand, or the amount of a substance consumed as a function of price, is a central dependent measure in behavioral economic research and represents the relative valuation of a substance. Although demand is often assumed to be relatively stable, recent clinical research has identified conditions in which demand can be manipulated. This study examines the 1-month reliability of the alcohol purchase task in a sample of heavy drinking college students, in subgroup analyses of individuals whose consumption decreased, increased, or stayed the same over the 1-month period, and in individuals with moderate/severe Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) vs. those with no/mild AUD. Reliability was moderate in the full sample, high in the group with stable consumption, and did not differ appreciably between AUD groups. These results provide evidence for relative stability over time and across AUD groups, particularly in those whose consumption remains stable.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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