Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

4891

Date

2017

Date of Award

4-14-2017

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

Major

Instr and Curr Leadership

Concentration

Reading

Committee Chair

Rebecca S. Anderson

Committee Member

Alison Happel-Parkins

Committee Member

Laurie MacGillivray

Committee Member

J. Helen Perkins

Abstract

The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore the perceptions and experiences of inner-city second grade students in an afterschool setting. Writing instruction has moved to the educational forefront as standardized writing assessments highlight student deficits; meanwhile, 21st century technology compoundsthe need for student utilization of digital writing tools. In order to address these concerns, this study questioned how a digital writing process influenced second graders' motivation, engagement, skills and performance, and writing identities in an afterschool setting. This semester long study includes data from eight undergraduate tutors and six focal children. Findings reveal three themes influenced the children as they navigated through a digital writing process: social interactions, personal connections, and technology-based text. Interpretations were provided with a model proposed for implementing a digital writing process in educational settings. Conclusions were made specific to empowerment, multiple audiences, afterschool programs, technology use, and writing themes. Implications regarding time, access to technology, and considerations for diverse learners were shared. Suggestions for future research were also listed.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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