Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

6004

Date

2017

Date of Award

7-25-2017

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

Major

Leadership and Policy Studies

Concentration

Educational Leadership

Committee Chair

Charisse Gulosino

Committee Member

Reginald Green

Committee Member

Barbara Davis

Committee Member

Louis Franceschini

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between student achievement assessed longitudinally in terms of ACTcomposite scores and state-mandated tests of proficiency and the perceived manner in which high schools resolve the tensions and tradeoffs illuminated by the Competing Values Framework(CVF). To answer the study's five research questions, a secondary analysis that applied hierarchical multiple regression to an existing dataset was undertaken. The dataset in question combined information from the 2013 administration of the Teaching, Empowering, Leading, and Learning (TELL) survey in 287 Tennessee high schools with concurrent school demographic and student achievement data archived on the Tennessee Departmetn of Education (TDOE) website.In the ten multiple regression analyses conducted, student demographic characteristics proved ot be the most important factors in explaining variation in student achievement, whether measured as three-year averages of ACTcomposite scores or three-year averages of student EOCassessments in Algebra Iand English. Although faculty demographiccharacteristics appeared to be directly linked to ACTcomposite scores, no such direct links were observed with respect to student proficiency scores. Over adn above these backgroud variables, the Competing Values Framework (CVF) porfiles concerning "balance", an "external"orientation, and a disposition towards "rational goals"were all associated with higher ACT composite scores, but only the CVF"balance"profile was significantly linked to student proficiency scores.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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