Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

6016

Date

2017

Date of Award

7-19-2017

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Psychology

Concentration

General Psychology

Committee Member

Katherine Howell

Abstract

This study investigated the dependability of teacher ratings of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder characteristics through the completion of the Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Rating Scale-IV, School Version and the Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Rating Scale-5, School Version, Child Form. Teacher pairs from five classrooms across two schools each independently rated the same ten randomly selected students from their classroom roster and completed three rating scales on each student, one of which was a filler. Generalizability theory was used to examine error variance across instrument, rater, and classroom concurrently, resulting in strong dependability coefficients for Inattention composite, Hyperactive/Impulsive composite, and Total Score composites. Variance estimates showed the differences in how teachers approached the completion of the ratings scales on a particular student and accounted for the largest proportion of total variance across all three composites. The results of assessing multiple sources of error concurrently instead of in isolation, as well as the outcomes of the recently updated ADHD Rating Scale-5 in this study, show promise in using Generalizability Theory to drive decisions for teachers and instrument users.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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