Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

6018

Date

2017

Date of Award

7-20-2017

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Major

Music

Concentration

Music Education

Committee Chair

Fisher Ryan

Committee Member

Armand Hall

Committee Member

Christian Mueller

Committee Member

Albert Nguyen

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a relationship between university music students' self-regulation, motivational beliefs, and background characteristics and the number and kinds of practice strategies used during 30 min of practicing. The research questions used to guide this study were: "After controlling for participants' known background characteristics (age, sex, primary instrument, years of playing, years of private lessons, average hr of practice per week, and training on another instrument), do university music students' self-regulatory abilities, self-perceptions and motivational beliefs (self-efficacy, locus of causal attributions, goal orientation, and implicit talent beliefs) predict the number of practice strategies used during a 30-min practice session?" and "After controlling for participants' known background characteristics (age, sex, primary instrument, years of playing, years of private lessons, average hr of practice per week, and training on another instrument), do university music students' self-regulatory abilities, self-perceptions and motivational beliefs (self-efficacy, locus of causal attributions, goal orientation, and implicit talent beliefs) predict the total kinds of practice strategies used during a 30-min practice session?" Participants in this study were undergraduate music students who played woodwind (n = 20) or brass instruments (n = 20), from three different universities in the mid-South. Results from a multiple regression revealed that participants' self-regulation, self-efficacy, locus of causal attributions, goal orientations, implicit talent beliefs, and background characteristics accounted for 56% of the outcome variable total number of strategies used. The strongest predictor that contributed to the regression model was performance approach goal orientation (ß = .57), followed by sex (ß = .52), locus of causal attributions (ß = -.52), and self-regulation (ß = .38). Results from the second multiple regression revealed that participants' self-regulation, self-efficacy, locus of causal attributions, goal orientations, implicit talent beliefs, and background characteristics accounted for 53% of the outcome variable kinds of strategies used. The strongest predictor that contributed to the regression model was the performance avoid goal orientation (ß = .42), followed by primary instrument family (ß = .37), self-efficacy (ß = -.30),self-regulation (ß = .29), and sex (ß = .29). Future research and implications for music educators are discussed.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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