Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

6061

Date

2017

Date of Award

12-4-2017

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

Major

Higher and Adult Education

Concentration

Higher Education

Committee Chair

Donna Menke

Committee Member

Wendy Griswold

Committee Member

Mary Boudreaux

Committee Member

Justin Lawhead

Abstract

The study is focused on the process of leadership identity development through an in-depth analysis of the experiences of and influences on intercollegiate female student-athletes at a mid-south, mid-size university that participates in Division 1 collegiate athletics. Research was conducted within the theoretical framework of the Leadership Identity Development (LID) model authored by Komives, Owen, Longerbeam, Mainella, and Osteen (2005). This study was interested in the degree to which the data upheld the presence of the four developmental influences of the LID model: 1) peer influences, 2) adult influences, 3) reflective learning, and 4) meaningful involvement. Framed by an understanding of college student development, leadership development, intercollegiate athletics and leadership, and the description of leadership identity development, the qualitative research examined the influence of intercollegiate athletics on the leadership identity development of female student-athletes. The findings were derived from semi-structured interviews, a focus group, and photo elicitation. The key findings of this research are:The relationships formed through participation in intercollegiate athletics contribute to leadership identity development of the female student-athletes.The four developmental influences (peer influence, adult influence, meaningful involvement, and reflective learning) affect the leadership identity development of the female intercollegiate athletes.There are specific processes involved with being an intercollegiate athlete that contribute to the development of the leadership identity within the female student-athletes.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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