Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

6153

Date

2018

Date of Award

4-23-2018

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Psychology

Committee Chair

Idia Thurston

Committee Member

Kathryn Howell

Committee Member

Randy Floyd

Abstract

Intimate partner violence (IPV) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) are independently associated with negative psychological outcomes. Spirituality has been linked to positive outcomes. The present study interviewed 183 women exposed to recent IPV and/or living with HIV. Latent profile analysis was used to identify patterns of mental health (depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress) and examine their associations with spirituality. Four profiles emerged: Very Low Distress, Low Distress, High Average Distress, and Very High Distress. Women in the Very Low and Low Distress groups reported higher spirituality than women in the High Average and Very High Distress groups. Findings contribute to the literature by highlighting the varying levels of mental health distress among women exposed to physical and socioemotional adversities and connecting these experiences to spirituality. Findings may contribute to the development of novel interventions aimed at improving mental health among women exposed to adversity by emphasizing benefits of incorporating spirituality.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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