Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

6210

Author

Erica Kessler

Date

2018

Date of Award

11-26-2018

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Psychology

Concentration

Cognitive Science

Committee Member

Jason Braasch

Committee Member

Andrew Olney

Committee Member

Craig Stewart

Abstract

The current research examined the role of epistemic beliefs about authority as well as source presence influence multiple text comprehension. Our sample was insensitive to our manipulation of source information availability (no source information, source information, embedded source information), however, several interesting relationships between the individual differences and measures of multiple text comprehension were observed. Prior knowledge was positively related to accurate essay information as well as source mentions in essays and rank-order justifications. In addition, justification by authority beliefs emerged as a positive predictor of source mentions in essays. Misconceptions about vaccines emerged a negative predictor of inclusion of accurate information in essays as well as source mentions in essays. Our findings suggest that readers rely on personal pre-existing beliefs to guide their reading and text comprehension. Further, readers with misconception beliefs appear to use less source information when forming mental representations of multiple texts.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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