Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

6216

Date

2018

Date of Award

11-26-2018

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Nutrition

Concentration

Clinical Nutrition

Committee Chair

Sara Foley

Committee Member

Mary Catherine Schallert

Committee Member

Karyl Buddington

Committee Member

Ruth Williams-Hooker

Abstract

In this study, the effect of a multicomponent nutrition education program on dietary behaviors in elementary school-aged children was analyzed. Components involved were cooking, gardening, and general nutrition. Research questions were: 'Does nutrition education over a one-week program increase consumption of fruits and vegetables?', and 'Does nutrition education over a one-week program increase acceptance of novel foods?'. The hypothesis was: nutrition education administered in a one-week program will increase the consumption of fruits and vegetables, as well as increase willingness to try new foods. Data collection used repeated measures of two surveys: the Fruit-Vegetable-Fiber Screener and Food Neophobia Scale. Ten participants were enrolled, two were lost to follow up. A Paired T-test and Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test found one question on each survey achieved statistical significance (p < 0.05); each question was directly related to Camp CHEF curricula. In conclusion, nutrition education in a summer camp setting has the potential to improve children's diets.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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