Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

6410

Date

2019

Date of Award

5-8-2019

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Major

Sociology

Committee Chair

Junmin Wang

Committee Member

Joseph Lariscy

Committee Member

SunAh Laybourn

Abstract

This study examines how the ongoing globalization process has shaped people's citizenship idenitities and values toward the distribution of political and economic benefits at the national level. These research questions are asked: Are people actually becoming more globalized? Are they developing a sense of global trust toward one another? Moreover, how do these global outlooks vary across different groups of individuals based on some key demographic identifiers such as age, education level, and social class? Using wave 5 and wave 6 from the World Values Survey dataset, this study examines these research questions in the context of nine high-income countries. The findings from binary and ordinal logistic regressions and Chi-square anallyses suggest that individual-level factors help produce variation in people's citizenship identities and global trust. In particular, it is found that an individual's social class and education level are statistically significant in predicting if indvidiuals have more globalized views.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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