Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

31

Date

2010

Date of Award

4-21-2010

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Health and Sport Science

Concentration

Health Promotion

Committee Chair

Onyejebose O Okwumabua

Committee Member

Kenneth D Ward

Committee Member

Michelle B Stockton

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between exposure to other people’s smoke and quitting smoking among 248 low income Black and White pregnant women. Indices of exposure included smoking restrictions in the home, number of regular smokers in the home, exposure to other’s smoke in the home, partner’s smoking behavior, and proportion of friends who smoke regularly. Covariates examined included age, income, education, nicotine dependence, and gestational age. Being exposed to smoking in the home (adjusted OR = 360; CI = .182 – .173), and the number of smokers in the home (adjusted OR = .594; CI = .377 – .934) were both related to decreased likelihood of cessation. There were no racial differences between any exposure/cessation associations. Results suggest that exposure to others’ smoking is a significant determinant of quitting smoking among low income black and white women and should be considered as a target for smoking cessation interventions in this population.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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