Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

6445

Date

2019

Date of Award

7-11-2019

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Earth Sciences

Concentration

Geography

Committee Chair

Youngsang Kwon

Committee Member

Arleen Alice Hill

Committee Member

Dorian Burnette

Abstract

Predicting climate-driven tree species’ future redistribution is a key element to guide preemptive forest management to mitigate the adverse consequences of climate change. This study uses the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) database to determine tree species’ potential. The dynamic variable calculated in the study is the standardized growth rate residual by basal area for a ten-year period (2003-2013). Residuals of growth rate are examined by latitude within each species’ range, indicating on-going habitat preference. This study examined six, US confined species that are climate sensitive. While this study hypothesized that high growth rate residuals would be present at northern range of climate-sensitive species compared to their southern range limits, indicating northward migration potential, two species (Black locust, Osage orange) showed northern migration potential, three tree species (Laurel oak, Water oak, Sweetbay) showed range contraction towards their southern boundaries, and one species (Willow oak) indicated southern migration.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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