Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

6477

Date

2019

Date of Award

8-6-2019

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Major

History

Concentration

History

Committee Chair

Andrew Daily

Committee Member

Beverly Bond

Committee Member

Susan O'Donovan

Abstract

This project involves re-examining Haiti's domestic and foreign policy from 1807-1867. The goal is to demonstrate that Haiti self-fashioned its role as a democratic republic. A second goal is to re-examine the politics of the Atlantic World by focusing on Haiti's participation. This was done by examining four important areas. First, the dynamics between mixed-race Haitians and black Haitians held over from pre-Independence Haiti. Second, Haiti's efforts to protect its independence. Third, Haiti's participation in independence and abolition movements throughout the Atlantic World. Finally, how Haiti's role in these events aids in our understanding of democratic ideals in this period. Upon examination of these events, it becomes clear that Haiti's participation helped to determine Haiti's future and the future of other republics. Through demonstrating Haiti's self-fashioning its role in the Atlantic World, this research establishes Haiti as a vital actor in understanding racial and liberal politics during the nineteenth century.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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