Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

6509

Date

2019

Date of Award

11-25-2019

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Mechanical Engineering

Concentration

Mechanical Engineering

Committee Chair

William Janna

Committee Member

John Hochstein

Committee Member

Jeffrey Marchetta

Abstract

Spherical paradichlorobenzene specimens were cast, then allowed to sublimate in a natural convection environment. The mass loss over time was recorded, suspending the specimens by a weigh bellow hook attached to a balance, which was required to obtain the sublimation rate. The diameters tested in this study were 3 cm, 4 cm, 5 cm, and 5.8 cm. A total of three data sets for each sized sphere were recorded to ensure accuracy. The results were used to determine the Schmidt, Grashoff, Sherwood, and Rayleigh numbers. After finding these values, an emperical equation was found relating the Sherwood number as a function of the Rayleigh number. Using this technique and these results it is possible to determine heat transfer coefficients via the heat mass transfer analogy. This method is not only bound to spheres and natural convection, for it can be used to analyze more complex geometries as well as forced convection environments.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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