Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

6541

Date

2020

Date of Award

3-17-2020

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Psychology

Concentration

Clinical Psychology

Committee Chair

James G Murphy

Committee Member

Meghan McDevitt-Murphy

Committee Member

Laura Marks

Abstract

Episodic Future Thinking (EFT), an exercise that involves cognitive simulation of the future, has demonstrated proximal effects on measures of impulsivity and alcohol demand. However, few studies have investigated EFT's potential to reduce alcohol use outside the lab. This study piloted an academic goal-relevant (A-EFT) intervention for heavy drinking college students. Forty-five heavy drinking undergraduated were randomized to complete a brief A-EFT intervention, or control task. Recruiment rates supported the feasibility of our approach; interest and scheduling rates were high, and booter and follow-up completion rates were good. Participants assigned to A-EFT increased the amount of time spent studying in the evening compared to students assinged to control. Within-group analyses revealed significant decreases in alcohol demand and alcohol consumption, and an increase in protective drinking strategies in the A-EFT group. The current study supports the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of an A-EFT intervention for college student heavy drinkers.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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