Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

6616

Date

2020

Date of Award

8-24-2020

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Psychology

Committee Chair

Philip Pavlik

Committee Member

Andrew Olney

Committee Member

Amanda Banker

Abstract

This research compared differences in grades among students who utilized an adaptive instructional system (AIS) to study for their undergraduate anatomy and physiology exams. The AIS implemented multimedia techniques by combining machine-generated cloze questions with images drawn from the A&P textbook, specifically chapters 9 (musculature) and 10 (nervous system). The AIS adapted to the performance of each student and optimally chose which question they should see next. Participants studied using this AIS before the exam and were given extra credit for participation. I hypothesized that students who practiced using the AIS will perform better on their exams than those that did not. I hypothesized that multimedia practice will lead to higher scores on questions that directly correspond to trials in the system. A series of ANOVAs did not show significant results. An exploratory regression revealed that lecture-basd questions were easier than lab-based, indicating the importance of the multimedia component.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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