Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

282

Date

2011

Date of Award

4-19-2011

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Health and Sport Science

Concentration

Exercise and Sport Science

Committee Chair

Brian K. Schilling

Committee Member

Lawrence W. Weiss

Committee Member

Yuhua Li

Abstract

A better understanding of the demands of a sport can be determined by identifying work-to-rest ratios and frequency of high-intensity movements, but limited research has been on indoor volleyball. Video footage of two matches for a mid-level NCAA Division I women's indoor volleyball team was analyzed using time motion analysis. Rally durations (mean of 7.6s), the rest times (mean of 18.8s), and the number of high-intensity movements (total of 1507) were recorded. The outside hitters, middle blockers, and setter performed the greatest number of HIM per rally with means of 0.78, 0.96 and 0.98 respectively and mean HIM/s of 0.031, 0.037, and 0.038 respectively. Total work and total time were calculated, 48.3 minutes and 166.5 minutes respectively. Therefore, the ball was only in play 29.0% of total time. The overall work-to-rest ratio was 0.40:1.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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