Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

6672

Date

2021

Date of Award

5-27-2021

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Psychology

Concentration

School Psychology

Committee Chair

Elizabeth Meisinger

Committee Member

Randy Floyd

Committee Member

Kristoffer Berlin

Abstract

This study aimed to understand the impact of comorbid disorders on reading growth. Among 105 students with an SLD in reading, many had up to four additional comorbid diagnoses, and disorder frequencies were coded based on the number of cooccurring conditions present. Reading fluency and comprehension skills were measured in the fall and spring using two reading assessments and served as the dependent variables in analyses. A series of mixed factorial ANCOVAs were conducted to examine the impact of comorbidity and gender on text-level reading skills. Results indicated that the number of cooccurring conditions did not make a statistically significant difference on reading fluency or growth across the school year, with girls exhibiting less growth than boys. Further, students in earlier grades demonstrated significant improvement in fluency across the year. Given these findings, future studies should further examine the effects of having multiple cooccurring conditions on reading skill growth.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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