Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

6680

Date

2021

Date of Award

4-27-2021

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Major

Sociology

Committee Chair

Wesley James

Committee Member

Joseph Lariscy

Committee Member

Jeni Loftus

Abstract

Social scientists have studied the long-term effects of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) on health outcomes for decades. More recently, researchers are beginning to focus on the short-term impact on early adulthood, as these years are foundational to future health behaviors and outcomes. Additionally, self-reporting is more accurate when assessed closer to the time of these experiences rather than futher along in life. This study draws on 2019 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data to add to the current understanding of adverse childhood experiences and their impact on young adult health. Another important aspect of this study is being able to determine the number of adverse childhood experiences that must be experienced before a decline in health begins. The findings show there is an inverse relationship between adverse childhood experiences and health in young adults. Furthermore, the decline in health is significant when one has experienced at least three adverse childhood experiences.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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