Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

6691

Date

2021

Date of Award

4-25-2021

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Major

Art History

Concentration

Egyptian Art and Archaeology

Committee Member

Lorelei Corcoran

Committee Member

Joshua Roberson

Committee Member

Rebecca Howard

Abstract

The object of this study is a painted plaster mask of an adult woman from Roman Egypt currently housed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY, Inv. 19.2.6. The mask has been stylistically attributed to Meir, the primary necropolis for Cusae. This mask represents the social identity of the deceased woman, while also embodying how she was transformed into a divine being through mummification. Through an analysis of the iconography of this funerary mask, as her chosen form of self-representation, I will place the multiple aspects of the life of the deceased into social, historical, and religious context. This thesis argues that the iconography on the funerary mask was utilized to represent the cultural identity and beliefs of the deceased and her renewal in the afterlife by representing her as Hathor, the patron goddess of Cusae.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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