Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

6702

Date

2021

Date of Award

5-7-2021

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Psychology

Committee Chair

Robert Cohen

Committee Member

Elizabeth Meisinger

Committee Member

Kathryn Howell

Abstract

Children's social interactions increasingly occur with the use of internet-accessible devices as Information and Communication Technologies(ICTs) continue to rise in both access and use, providing a powerful platform for children to experience victimization. Of particular interest to the present research was children's (22 children, Males - 105, Females = 117) willingness to tell a friend and willingness to tell a parent about experiences of cyber victimization (Grades 3 and $) to cyber victimiztion one year later (Grades 4 and 5), controlling for cyber victimization at Time 1 and cyber usage at Time 2. For males, willingness to tell a friend at Time 1 about cyber victimzation was associated with less cyber victimization at Time 2 than not being willing to tell a friend. For females, willingness to tell a parent at Time 1 about cyber victimization was associated with less cyber victimization at Time 2 than not being willing to tell a parent. These findings underscore the importance of using disclosure as a coping strategy to reduce future incidences of cyber victimization and highlight the complexity of this strategy in terms of gender and nature of social support

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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