Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

6733

Date

2021

Date of Award

7-14-2021

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Psychology

Concentration

Child Develop & Family Studies

Committee Chair

Kathryn H Howell

Committee Member

Debra Bartelli

Committee Member

Robert Cohen

Abstract

Children's adaptive and maladaptive functioing may be influenced by several individual and relational factors, including aspects of the parent-child relationship. Specifically, a parent-child relationship that is characterized by closeness and affection may strengthen adaptive skills, while a parent-child relationship that is high in conflict may contribute to children's externaliziing and internalizing problems. The current study assessed associations between parent and child trauma exposure, aspects of the parent-child relationship, and children's adaptive and maladaptive functioning. Participants included 53 cargivers (Mage = 35.48; SD = 9.95) of children aged 6 to 11 years who were recruited organizations in the MidSouth, United States. Results from multivariate regression modeling indicated that lower parent-child conflict and higher parent-child closeness were associated with higher adaptive skills in children. Additionally, higher parent trauma exposure and higher parent-chil conflict were associated with more externalizing problems in children. These findings highlight the influence of parental factors on youth functioning.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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