Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

6107

Date

2017

Date of Award

12-6-2017

Document Type

Thesis (Access Restricted)

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Psychology

Concentration

Clinical Psychology

Committee Member

J Gayle Beck

Committee Member

Robert Cohen

Committee Member

DeMond Grant

Abstract

Prevalence of co-occurring posttraumatic stress disorder and social anxiety disorder (co-SAD/PTSD) ranges from 4.2-72% in clinical samples, suggesting exploration of moderating factors to better understand this comorbidity (Green et al., 1992, Orsillo, Heimberg, Juster, & Garrett, 1996). Previous reseach has found that shame (Orisllo et al., 1996) and history of childhood abuse (CA; Zayfert, DeViva, & Hofmann, 2005) are prevalent among those with co-SAD/PTSD. The present study examined shame and CA as potential moderators of co-SAD/PTSD in a sample of women exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV). A significant 3-way interaction was found. Contrary to prediction, high shame significantly increased the association between SAD and PTSD among CA-, but not among CA+. These findings sugest that heightened shame may be of more relevance among IPV survivors without history of CA. Results are discussed in light of moderating processes that may differentially influence co-SAD/PTSD among individuals with and without CA.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

Dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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