Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

294

Date

2011

Date of Award

4-22-2011

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Musical Arts

Major

Music

Concentration

Performance

Committee Chair

Frank Shaffer

Committee Member

Kenneth Kreitner

Committee Member

David Evans

Committee Member

John Baur

Abstract

The literature for solo snare drumming has grown out of the strictly rudimental style and is now influenced by any number of traditional or modern techniques and styles. This requires the performer to be not only a master of rudimental and orchestral snare drum techniques, but to also be very familiar with world musical styles and to be open to new musical ideas being presented on the snare drum.The Nexus Portfolio for Snare Drum, containing five solo pieces for the snare drum, one by each member of the percussion ensemble Nexus, represents an excellent example of the variety of musical styles and technical requirements found in modern solo snare drum literature. Each solo is influenced by a different world musical style and reflects the interests and specialty of each individual composer. Additionally, the members of the group Nexus are considered by many to be some of the leading composers, performers and teachers of percussion and music for percussion, in the history of the art.The purpose of this lecture recital and research document is to prepare and perform the five snare dum solos in the Nexus Portfolio for Snare drum, focusing on the performance practice problems and a discussion of the compositional intent of the composers.The paper will delve into the background of the composers Bill Cahn, John Wyre, Robin Engelman, Bob Becker, and Russell Hartenberger, analysis of the five works, and comparison of the different styles of each solo. In addition, based on the analysis, performance problems inherent in each solo will be discussed and exercises to achieve maximum artistic expression will be included.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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