Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

2678

Author

Yongquan Zhou

Date

2016

Date of Award

4-27-2016

Document Type

Dissertation (Access Restricted)

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Major

Engineering

Concentration

Mechanical Engineering

Committee Chair

Jiada Mo

Committee Member

Teong Tan

Committee Member

Hsiang Hsi Lin

Committee Member

Michael Racer

Abstract

Started with the brief history of the development of the distribution packaging fundamentals, and the needs in accurately understanding of the static and dynamic characteristics of shipping environment critical in defining adequate specifications to design package to prevent product damage in transit and fundamental elements to develop standard to test evaluate the performance of the package in the lab, the dissertation focused on the packaging dynamics in FedEx Express and FedEx Ground shipping environment. In addition to study of most common distribution hazards - drop height and vibration always interested by packaging professionals, this dissertation took advantage of full access to the FedEx facilities and investigated other distribution hazards never identified and studied before - namely impacts and impact compressions packages experience during hub sort operations. Also for the first time ever, this dissertation taking lab simulation approach studied the effect of the dynamic compression on packages in vehicle stacking during small parcel express transportation, and developed a logical, quantitative, practical method and procedure used to design corrugated shipping containers with required compression strength for vehicle stacking in small parcel express transportation environment. The dissertation gave great details on the theoretical fundamentals used in the study, the state-of-the-art technology and applications of the shock and vibration data recorders, design and calibration of instrument packages, test setup and matrix, data processing and analysis, and conclusions drawn from the results of the studies.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

Dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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