Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

6136

Date

2018-04-17

Date of Award

2018

Document Type

Thesis (Campus Access Only)

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Major

Criminology and Criminal Jus

Committee Chair

Stephen Watts

Committee Member

James McCutcheon

Committee Member

Bert Burraston

Abstract

Authoritative parenting has been found to influence several outcomes from childhood through adulthood. Few studies have examined the influence parenting has on behavior in emerging adulthood. The current study observes the effect of authoritative parenting on criminal behavior in emerging adulthood in a sample of Americans drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) (N=11,642). Additionally, this study examines whether the effect of authoritative parenting on criminal behavior is moderated by individual genotype. A gender specific analysis is warranted. Results show that authoritative parenting decreases criminal behavior in emerging adulthood among females, but not males. Female carriers of the 2R or 3R allele of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) combined with the 10R/10R allele of dopamine transporter 1 (DAT1) report the least criminal behavior when authoritative parenting is highest and the most criminal behavior when authoritative parenting is at its lowest. Future direction of biosocial research is discussed.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

Dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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