Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

1369

Date

2015-04-23

Date of Award

2015

Document Type

Dissertation (Campus Access Only)

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Major

History

Committee Chair

Aram Goudsouzian

Committee Member

Beverly Bond

Committee Member

Sarah Potter

Committee Member

Charles McKinney

Abstract

This study examines the Memphis NAACP and Black community protest during the critical but often overlooked period after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., from 1968-1975. During these years, the organization led three major campaigns: the Ghetto Development Project, Black Monday protest, and the school busing initiative. These events tackled issues prominent in the Black community such as poverty, employment, and education. During this time, the Memphis NAACP repositioned itself at the forefront of the Black freedom struggle by blending a more radical approach with its traditional emphasis on gradual legal rights. It blurred the lines between civil rights and Black Power. Through protest, marches, and boycotts, Black Memphians were able to achieve quick gains in a short time frame.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

Dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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