Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

6763

Date

2021

Date of Award

11-10-2021

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Psychology

Concentration

Behavioral Neuroscience

Committee Chair

Deranda Lester

Committee Member

James Murphy

Committee Member

Helen Sable

Abstract

Dopamine autoreceptors (DARs) and dopamine transporters (DATs) influence dopamine transmission in the brain's mesolimbic pathway. Prior studies have focused on how activation of DARs influences trafficking of DATs, but how DATs influence DARs remains unclear. Male and female C57BL/6J mice received daily injections of either cocaine (DAT blocker) or saline for seven days then underwent stereotaxic surgery to obtain fixed potential amperometric recordings of DAR-mediated dopamine release. All mice received a mid-surgery injection of cocaine, and DAR-mediated dopamine release was assessed once more during maximal DAT blockade. The current study found that DAR functionality was increased during peak cocaine effects, suggesting DAR work harder to maintain homeostasis. Additionally, DAT function was increased following chronic cocaine exposure, but DAR functioning was unchanged, indicating DAR may be resistant to drug-induced alterations. Understanding the neurochemical mechanisms that control dopamine signaling is critical for informing treatment efforts for addiction, ADHD, and depression.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

Dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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