Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

316

Date

2011

Date of Award

5-11-2011

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Psychology

Committee Chair

Elizabeth B. Meisinger

Committee Member

Randy G Floyd

Committee Member

J. Helen Perkins

Abstract

Several informal, classroom-based methods currently exist for evaluating reading performance, but the daily demands teachers face require that assessment be as efficient and effective as possible. The purpose of this study was to examine two different approaches to analyzing oral reading-- assessment of word recognition ability and miscue analysis-- in search of a parsimonious approach to children's reading assessment in a sample of second-grade children. Children's word reading was assessed through administration of context-free word lists, and oral reading miscues were gathered from reading of connected text. The results suggested that substitution miscues and self-correction of errors were significantly correlated with reading comprehension. Hierarchical regression analysis revealed that various types of substitution miscues, particularly those that preserved the meaning and grammar of the text, were better predictors of comprehension than were norm-referenced word-reading tasks. Implications for educators and school psychologists are discussed.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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