Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Date

2019

Date of Award

2019

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

Department

Instruction & Curriculum Leadership

Committee Chair

Craig Shepherd

Committee Member

J. Helen Perkins

Committee Member

Colton Cockrum

Committee Member

Donna Menke

Abstract

The purpose of this quantitative, correlational study was to examine the influence that completion of course module activities in an academic strategies course have on academic probation students academic achievement (change in term GPA) and semester-to-semester retention, while considering potentially influential demographic and environmental variables. There were two research questions included in this study: How does completion of course module activities (predictor variable) predict academic achievement (criterion variable), measured by change in term GPA, of first-time academic probation students enrolled in an academic strategies course and how does completion of course module activities (predictor variable) predict semester to semester retention (criterion variable) of first-time academic probation students enrolled in an academic strategies course? A predictive correlation design was used in this study. The results of the multiple regression analysis indicated in two of the predictor variables, gender and classification were not statistically significant in the stepwise model. However, three predictor variables, course completion, race (black) and college (College of Communication and Fine Arts; and Academic Counseling Center), were statistically significant to predicting change of term GPA. The results of the binomial logistics regression analysis indicated two predictor variables, gender and race, were not statistically significant. The other three predictor variablescourse completion, classification, and college (College of Engineering)were statistically significant to predict the criterion variable, retention.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

Dissertation or thesis originally submitted to ProQuest

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