Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

337

Date

2011

Date of Award

7-11-2011

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Major

English

Committee Chair

Stephen E. Tabachnick

Committee Member

Joshua Phillips

Committee Member

Theron Britt

Abstract

Graphic novel adaptations of classic texts are not fully recognized for their potential contributions to scholarship. This thesis argues that a graphic novel adaptation of classic literature can function as literary criticism of its source while allowing for further interpretation. Case studies include three classic texts with their corrsponding graphic novel adaptations: Shakespeare's Macbeth with Shakespeare's Macbeth: the Manga Edition, and Classical Comics' Macbeth: the Graphic Novel; Shelley's Frankenstein with Classical Comics' Frankenstein: the Graphic Novel; and Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray with adaptations by Thomas and Fiumara and by Edginton and Culbard. Findings demonstrate complex ways in which adaptations engage reader/viewers and facilitate analysis of their sources. The graphic novel interprets through visual image, rhetoric, and linkingof themes and motifs; it can also visually express concepts. Since its reader/viewer interprets as well, the graphic novel adaptation functions as collaborative criticism between the reader/viewer and source text.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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