Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

339

Date

2011

Date of Award

7-22-2011

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Major

Psychology

Concentration

Experimental Psychology

Committee Chair

Rick Dale

Committee Member

Roger J. Kreuz

Committee Member

Max Louwerse

Committee Member

Eugene Buder

Abstract

This dissertation evaluated three possible levels of processing that interlocutors engage in during interactive discourse. The first section is a review of literature that attempts to link priming, adaptation, and interpretation. The second section presents two experiments that have been recently published in Language and Cognitive Processes. This study evaluated the tendency for interlocutors to mimic pragmatic forms of language during a pseudo-interaction. The third section offers three experiments that evaluated the contexts in which communication breakdown drives disambiguation strategies. This paper is currently under preparation and will be submitted to the Journal of Memory and Language. The fourth section of experiments is a production and perception study that evaluated how talker variability influences the interpretation of intent behind affective expressions. Finally, the last section provides general conclusions of how priming, adaptation, and interpretation may be linked during discourse. The five sections together intend to show that priming, adaptation, and interpretation are integrative processes that may be enlisted as cooperative mechanisms. Though these mechanisms may be integrative, the approaches used to study them were independent in order to better asses each mechanisms' unique contribution to language processing.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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