Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

410

Date

2011

Date of Award

8-17-2011

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Biomedical Engineering

Committee Chair

John Williams

Committee Member

William Mihalko

Committee Member

Eugene Eckstein

Abstract

The objective of this thesis was to develop and implement a methodology to enable knee kinematics to be studied during an in vitro simulated squat. As an application of the methodology, it was used to examine the null hypothesis that a knee with a posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) retaining total knee arthroplasty (TKA) would show no differences in kinematics compared with a PCLsacrificing TKA. A surgical navigation system was used in combination with a knee simulator, and algorithms were developed to calculate knee kinematics from motion capture data and bone and implant landmarks. The methodology employed in this study produced kinematics for two knees obtained post-mortem from two primary TKAsubjects. The results demonstrated differences in kinematics between the two knees with different TKA designs that were corroborated by published in vitro and vivo studies of the same implant designs.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

Share

COinS