Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

462

Date

2011

Date of Award

11-28-2011

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Biology

Committee Chair

S. Reza Pezeshki

Committee Member

Duane D McKenna

Committee Member

Scott B Franklin

Abstract

Dense stands of Arundinaria gigantea (Walt.) Chapm. or canebrakes werecommon in the southeastern US, but currently are a critically endangered ecosystem with less than 2% of their area remaining. Remnant canebrakes have become fragmented and isolated.In this study, arthropod communities within these canebrake patches and non-cane patches were examined to assess general island biogeography theories.Four patches (>0.5ha; <0.5ha to >0.1ha; <0.1ha; adjacent non cane patch) were selected at four sites in the Mississippi alluvial valley during three collection periods. Measures of diversity, community composition, and functional group organization were compared to determine if differences existed.Diversity measures and functional group organization did not differ among patch sizes. Diversity measures decreased as distance from canebrakes increased. Canebrakes contained many species that were not found in adjacent non-cane patches with almost 97% uncommon to rare. Conservation of canebrakes is necessary to maintain the biodiversity of these uncommon arthropods.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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