Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

465

Date

2011

Date of Award

11-28-2011

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Psychology

Concentration

General Psychology

Committee Chair

Meghan E. McDevitt-Murphy

Committee Member

James G. Murphy

Committee Member

Sagrestano M. Lynda

Abstract

After combat, social support may reduce the severity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol consumption. This study tested the buffering and direct effect theories of social support to determine if combat exposure moderated the relationship between unit cohesion and PTSD and the relationship between postdeployment social support and PTSD. The impact of combat exposure, unit cohesion, and postdeployment social support on alcohol consumption was investigated. Seventy hazardous-drinking veterans (63% Caucasian, 90% men) completed structured interviews and self-report measures. Combat exposure moderated the relationship between unit cohesion and PTSD. Unit cohesion was related to reduced PTSD severity for lower combat exposure; there was no relationship between unit cohesion and PTSD for higher combat exposure. Higher postdeployment social support was related to less severe PTSD. Combat exposure, unit cohesion, and postdeployment social support had no effect on alcohol consumption. Although neither theory was supported, results highlight the link between social support and PTSD.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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