Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

509

Date

2012

Date of Award

4-15-2012

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Psychology

Concentration

Clinical Psychology

Committee Chair

James P Whelan

Committee Member

George Relyea

Committee Member

Andrew W. Meyers

Abstract

Impulsivity has been implicated as a contributing factor in the development of gambling problems among college students, but attempts to confirm this relation has been inconsistent. An explanation for incongruous findings is that impulsivity may be multidimensional and differentially predictive of behaviors. Utilizing a diverse sample of college students, a factor analysis of self-report measures of impulsivity revealed a three-factor structure of Behavioral Activation, Preference for Stimulation, and Inhibition Control that was remarkably similar to the structure found by Meda and colleagues (2009). Low risk and symptomatic gamblers scored significantly lower on Behavioral Activation and Inhibition Control than non-gamblers. Conversely, low risk and symptomatic gamblers scored significantly higher on Preference for Stimulation. Prevalence of gambling and gambling activity preference for this sample was also assessed.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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