Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

600

Date

2012

Date of Award

4-18-2012

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Major

History

Committee Chair

Arwin Smallwood

Committee Member

Charles Crawford

Committee Member

Aram Goudsouzian

Abstract

This is a study of African Americans in Memphis, Tennessee. The primary focus is on the transition from slavery to freedom, 1860-1870, and how the changing social structure affected and was influenced by AfricanAmerican agency. City, county, federal, and state records were used. Specifically, the Memphis Public Library, University of Memphis Special Collections, and Shelby County Archives served as sources of information. Additionally, a comprehensive bibliography of secondary sources was examined and utilized. Unique conditions existed in Memphis. Since its founding, extrememly oppressive conditions existed for slaves and free people of color, which created a resonating struggle for the African American community. Control over African Americans came in many forms, including work, education, and other social factors. It has been concluded that too much black agency, rather than stricly race, caused the riots of 1866. After Reconstruction, African American were gradually forced into submission by the close of the century.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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