Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Identifier

671

Date

2012

Date of Award

7-22-2012

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Major

Earth Sciences

Concentration

Geography

Committee Chair

Arleen Alice Hill

Committee Member

Andrew Michael Mickelson

Committee Member

Lisa Keys-Mathews

Abstract

Southern pine forests thrive on disturbance to remain in sub-climax species composition. Wind disturbance can affect both the health and species composition of forest vegetation and may force forests back to the sub-climax stage if the effects of hurricanes are managed properly. This work explores hurricane impacts on forest health. Post-hurricane change is classified by measuring two components of forest health and then assigning an outcome class based on the components. The components are vegetation health (NDVI) and forest composition. Using Landsat imagery to quantify baseline values, change is recorded for storms of different intensities. Findings classify storms as having a positive, neutral, or negative effect on the forest health and link this effect to storm strength and to management priorities. Category 3 was found to be the threshold for disturbance to have a positive impact on forest health if managed properly.

Comments

Data is provided by the student.

Library Comment

dissertation or thesis originally submitted to the local University of Memphis Electronic Theses & dissertation (ETD) Repository.

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